Many U.S. soldiers survived the battlefields in Afghanistan and Iraq, only to face internal battles with post-traumatic stress disorder and thoughts of suicide once they return home.

According to statistics, 22 veterans take their lives each day, totaling over 8,000 individuals a year.

Award-winning journalist Soledad O’Brien follows a few of these soldiers as they grapple with the painful effects of PTSD in her new documentary, The War Comes Home.

O’Brien spoke with Roland Martin about the film during Tuesday’s edition of NewsOne Now. The War Comes Home is available in theaters for one night only via Fathomevents.com.

Martin explained the media does not necessarily cover stories about veterans that are “very authentic.”

The men highlighted in the film are attending a five and a half day program designed to deal with their battles against PTSD. Once the Save A Warrior program is completed, cameras followed the two men home to see what aspects of the program helped the war vets cope with PTSD.

According to O’Brien, the Save A Warrior program uses transcendental meditation, ropes courses, and equine-assisted therapy to help soldiers with the impact of post-traumatic stress disorder.

Unfortunately, there is still a stigma associated with PTSD. O’Brien said soldiers “feel like it’s going to have an impact on their career” if they come forward to seek help for the debilitating condition.

She told Martin, the film chronicles “what it is like to be up close and in the lives” of someone feeling suicidal. Film subject Delon Beckett defines feeling suicidal as like living life “as a building that’s on fire.

Visit Fathomevents.com for times, locations, and tickets, and be sure to attend one of the exclusive screenings of The War Comes Home.

TV One’s NewsOne Now has moved to 7 A.M. ET, be sure to watch “NewsOne Now” with Roland Martin, in its new time slot on TV One.

Subscribe to the “NewsOne Now” Audio Podcast on iTunes.

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