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A Glimpse into the African American Experience in Early Chicago

Fugitives and Freeman exhibition come to life in Chicago

Fugitives and Freeman exhibition come to life in Chicago

 

 

 

 

 

Built in 1836 for Henry Brown Clarke, the Clarke House Museum is oldest surviving building in the original Chicago city limits. The house shows what family life was like in Chicago during the city’s formative years before the Civil War (1853-60).

Built in 1836 for Henry Brown Clarke, the Clarke House Museum is oldest surviving building in the original Chicago city limits. The house shows what family life was like in Chicago during the city’s formative years before the Civil War (1853-60).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

In the land of Lincoln fugitive slaves and freemen established Chicago’s first Black community in the 1840s, with the population nearing 1,000 by 1860. Although hindered by discrimination through both state and federal laws, these courageous men and women of African descent  thrived in the growing city inspire of the racism that taunted them every step of the way. Still they sought to help others do the same. Learn about their challenges and triumphs during turbulent times with presentations by four noted historians:Dr. Christopher R. Reed, Glennette Tilley Turner, Dr. Victoria L. Harrison and Steven M. LaBarre. The day will conclude with a tour of Clarke House Museum. Don’t miss this fascinating glimpse into the African American experience in early Chicago.

PRESENTATIONS

  • 10 am  Black Life in Earliest Chicago, Up to the Civil War  Dr. Christopher R. Reed
  • 11:15 am  The Underground Railroad in Illinois  Glennette Tilley Turner
  • 1 pm  “We Are Here Assembled”: Illinois Colored Conventions, 1853-1873  Victoria L. Harrison
  • 2:30 pm  Freedom for Themselves: Chicago’s Black Soldiers in the Civil War  Steven M. LaBarre

 

EXHIBITORS

  • Bronzeville Visitor Information Center
  • Chicago Public Library Harsh Research Collection
  • DuSable Museum of African American History

 

An optional tour Clarke House Museum offered at the conclusion of the program. Don’t miss this fascinating glimpse into the African American experience in early Chicago.

The symposium will take place  Saturday April 25, 2015, from 9am to 5 pm at the Glessner House Museum located at 1800 S. Prairie Ave., Chicago, IL 60616.

The Admission  is $30 per person (includes parking, breakfast and lunch refreshments)

$25 for Students, Museum Volunteers, Docents and IL Colonial Dames. The seating is limited.

Pre-paid reservations requested should call  312.326.1480 also for more information visit the Website at  www.glessnerhouse.org

Built in 1836 for Henry B. Clarke, the Clarke House Museum is Chicago’s oldest house. The house shows what life was like for a family in Chicago during the city’s formative years before the Civil War. Its fascinating history began at a time when Chicago received its city charter and much of the area was still undeveloped prairie. Over the years, the house survived fires, belonged to a church and was moved twice. (During the second move, the house was stuck in the air for two weeks.) The house is now located in the Chicago Women’s Park in the Prairie Avenue Historic District, and operated as a museum by the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events.

The Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events is dedicated to enriching Chicago’s artistic vitality and cultural vibrancy. This includes fostering the development of Chicago’s non-profit arts sector, independent working artists and for-profit arts businesses; providing a framework to guide the City’s future cultural and economic growth, via the 2012 Chicago Cultural Plan; marketing the City’s cultural assets to a worldwide audience; and presenting high-quality, free and affordable cultural events for residents and visitors.

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