UVa to commemorate site of free black community

The University of Virginia is planning to dedicate a small park on its South Lawn to remember a once-thriving neighborhood of free black people.

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (AP) — The University of Virginia is planning to dedicate a small park on its South Lawn to remember a once-thriving neighborhood of free black people. The event Friday will honor Catherine Foster, a free black woman who purchased the property in 1833. The community that grew around it became known as Canada, and is thought to hold the graves of Foster, her descendants and others. U.Va. officials say a number of Foster descendants are expected to attend the celebration. Excavators in 1993 found an unmarked coffin, the first trace of the Canada neighborhood. Subsequent archaeological digs uncovered Foster’s home’s cellar and other artifacts. U.Va.’s $105 million South Lawn expansion preserves the outline of Foster’s home, the location of the cemetery and some of the original cobblestones. Copyright 2011 The Associated Press.

Comments

From the Web

X
X