Dear ‘Love & Hip Hop Atlanta,’ violence against women is NOT entertaining!

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erica pinkett

Last night’s episode of “Love & Hip Hop Atlanta” was disturbing on many levels. Not only did it showcase violence against women, it proved that television networks like VH1 will air anything for ratings. In case you don’t spend your Monday evenings catching up with VH1′s popular production, you may be unaware of the altercation that occurred between Lil Scrappy and his “friend” Erica Pinkett. Scrappy and Pinkett had a mostly platonic relationship. Somehow, lines were blurred and this ultimately led up to Scrappy and Pinkett meeting for lunch to discuss their non-existent relationship. The situation grew tense and Pinkett threatened to slap Scrappy to which Scrappy responded, “That will be the last time ever slapping a n*gga in real life.” The screen went black as Pinkett appeared to throw her drink on Scrappy’s. We can only assume what happened…

Earlier this year, Scrappy’s ex Diamond accused him of being abusive toward her. “He was mentally abusive, physically abusive,” she revealed during an interview on Power 105.1. “We fought, like you ain’t beatin’ my a**. Yeah, he got some issues. Some demons, he needs some help,” she added. This isn’t the first case of domestic violence we’ve heard in the news lately. Former “Scandal” actor Columbus Short was charged with spousal battery in March after an argument between he and his wife Tanee McCall escalated to physical violence. Disgraced “Shield” actor Michael Jace murdered his wife after in front of their children after an alleged dispute over finances. R&B singer/songwriter The Dream made headlines when his baby’s mother claimed he choked and kicked her while she was pregnant. The tales of abuse go on and on.

 

Scrappy and Pinkett’s situation was even more bothersome because it was aired on national TV. MTV faced criticism for this very matter when they aired a promo clip of Snooki being punched in the face by a man on their show “The Jersey Shore.” They pulled the video and released this statement: “What happened to “Snooki” was a crime and obviously extremely disturbing.” They added, “After hearing from our viewers, further consulting with experts on the issue of violence, and seeing how the video footage has been taken out of context to not show the severity of this act or the resulting consequences, MTV has decided not to air ‘Snooki’ being physically punched in next week’s episode.”

We guess VH1 only got a portion of the memo. While VH1 didn’t air the actual fight between Scrappy and Pinkett (if there was one), we did see enough to render judgement. We don’t deny that Pinkett provoked Scrappy and that she was in the wrong as well, but there is no excuse for how Scrappy handled the situation. Violence against women is never OK.

It was even more disheartening to watch Pinkett describe to Momma Dee, Scrappy’s mother, what happened between her and her son–a sacred moment that no woman should have to relive, let alone share with the world. “I’ve never seen him so angry and irate,” she said with tears pooling by her chin. “When I looked at your son, I felt like I didn’t know who he was.” Why was this ever filmed? Is this entertaining? Better yet, why was it ever aired? This woman was publicly humiliated on more than one occasion. And frankly, VH1 is going to re-air this episode with no regards to the victim or parties involved. Nor did the episode show Scrappy being reprimanded for his actions, sending the message to viewers than violence against women is just washed away with tears and a promise “it will never happen again.” Scrappy did what he did, Erica cried and the show moved on.Obviously VH1 cared more about ratings than Erica Pinkett (or Scrappy for that matter). It’s an embarrassing situation for both parties and VH1 just milked the sh*t out of it. Thanks.Reality sucks.

 

Check Out This Gallery Of Celebrities Who have Survived Domestic Violence:

Originally seen on http://hellobeautiful.com/

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