Black Reality Shows: When Did Selling Our Pain Become a Hot Commodity?

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Tamika Mallory of News One checks in on black reality television and the denigration of African-American culture. 
 
It’s usually hard to find time to just shut down and do nothing. As someone who is generally on the road at speaking engagements, organizing rallies, or managing my family, I don’t sit back and watch non-news-related TV that much.  But every now and then, I will tune in and catch some of these “reality shows.” Looking at many of the programs, I noticed a common thread: violent and duplicitous behavior.
 
Whether it’s Love & Hip-Hop, Bad Girls Club, The Real Housewives of Atlanta, Gossip Game, Married to Medicine or any other show, all I see is a bunch of mostly Black females fighting, cursing each other out, talking about one another behind their back, and just acting plain old crazy.
 
Did I miss a memo or something?
 
When did that become the norm?
 
And the big question is, at what point did we decide that selling our pain was a hot commodity?  It’s called “pain for profit.”  And I would ask, who’s making the real money, but I won’t go there today. Just know that the $5,000 to $10,000 check per episode is nothing compared to the millions being made by corporations broadcasting such foolishness.
 
There’s a disturbing epidemic of young girls from elementary school on through high school increasingly fighting, viciously attacking each other, and resorting to violence to solve their conflicts.
 
Sound familiar?
 
If you think the images in pop culture don’t have an impact, why don’t you go to YouTube and look up girl fights. Warning:  it’s not pretty.  OK, so reality TV isn’t the only problem, but it is definitely contributing negatively to perceptions of minorities and to the way in which we view ourselves.
 
When I turn on the TV and see bottles being thrown, women pulling each other’s hair out, punching each other, fighting over men, and cursing everyone out, I can’t just shake my head and ignore it. I can’t get over the fact that I see kids acting out in the same way that I see these grown women behaving.
 
Read more at News One.
 
(Photo: VH1)
 

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