NOT Your Usual Suspects

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In our previous wine post, we talked about the usual suspects.  This time we will examine “The Road Less Traveled” or NOT YOUR USUAL SUSPECTS.

There are hundreds of wines that aren’t normally thought of when thinking of or even tasting wines. Today we will examine a few of those wines that once they are tasted, you’ll have a newfound appreciation for wine.

Albarinois arguably one of the most popular white Spanish varietals that most have never heard of until recent years.  It is a crisp, clean, medium-bodied white wine that has a pure nose of tropical fruits and flavors of lemon, lime and peach with a zingy acidity, and a dry finish.  It is ideal for practically any shellfish.

Carmenere:  is made from a fascinating grape “Carmenere” that is practically unknown in the U.S.  It is a big tasty RED with great fruit and a hint of smoke.   It is very approachable on the palate and what I like to refer to as a great “introductory red.”  On the nose there are aromas of red fruit, spice and herbs, on the palate there are flavors of strawberry, raspberry, cherry and chocolate.  Personally it is one of my favorite go to wines after a long hard day at the office.

 

Malbec:  is a red wine that originated in France, but found a home and fame in Argentina where it has prospered very nicely there.  In recent years, Malbec has gained wide sweeping popularity as so many other New World wines have.  It is medium-full bodied, rich in fruit with a hint of spice.

 

Torrontes:  although I am more partial to red wines for my own palate, this indigenous white wine of Argentina, speaks to explosive aromas and is one of my favorite whites, that is if you were twisting my arm to drink whites.  It has very lively notes of citrus and peach fruit, with delicate layers of jazmine blossom and fresh herbs.  It is typically light and fresh on the palate with an excellent balance and finish.

Verdejo is a very light indigenous wine of Spain.  It has subtle hints of a juicy peach and grapefruit with distinct herbal flavors on the finish.  One of my favorite whites!

In my next blog posting we will focus on wines that are great introductory wines.

To learn more about the basics of wine and beyond, allow us to take you on that journey.

Elbert Hatley, The Wine Guide

info@the-wineguide.com

www.the-wineguide.com

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