Daley disappointed by Supreme Court gun ruling

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Chicago Mayor Richard Daley said he’s disappointed by Monday’s widely expected Supreme Court decision that Americans have a right to own a gun for self-defense anywhere but promised to soon push for a new ordinance regulating handguns in the city.

Chicago Mayor Richard Daley said he’s disappointed by Monday’s widely expected Supreme Court decision that Americans have a right to own a gun for self-defense anywhere but promised to soon push for a new ordinance regulating handguns in the city. A clearly troubled Daley did not offer any specifics hours after the court issued its ruling. He stressed that while the city’s 28-year-old ban remains in place until a federal appeals court reconsiders its ruling, it’s clear it will be overturned. Daley indicated he knew the ruling was coming and that the city has been working on a new ordinance in the two years since the court overturned a similar ban in Washington, D.C. He said he will act quickly to push through a new ordinance, suggesting that he might call a special session to deal with the issue. "We must continue to stand up to the gun and drug thugs who only want to terrorize our communities and harm our people," he said. Daley was flanked by other city officials and parents whose children have been killed by gun violence, and suggested that those who have fought him on the issue simply don’t understand what the parents have gone through. "If your son or daughter got killed, you’d be behind me right now," he said. "That’s where you’d be." Monday’s Supreme Court decision did not explicitly strike down the ban on handguns in Chicago and suburban Oak Park. Instead, it ordered a federal appeals court to reconsider its ruling. But it left little doubt that the statutes eventually would fall. One parent angrily blasted the court’s decision. "This is a slap in the face to parents, those of us who have lost our children to gun violence," said Annette Nance-Holt, whose 16-year-old son was shot to death on a city bus as he tried to shield a friend when a gang member boarded the bus and began firing at rival gang members. "More guns equals to me more problems, more deaths, more funerals, more parents like me," she said. Mara Georges, the city’s corporation counsel, said many regulations remain in place in Chicago and throughout the state. For example, she said, for example that it remains illegal to carry a concealed weapon in Illinois and possession a gun in the city that’s not registered with the police department. Gun rights advocates reacted to the court’s decision by saying that they expect the legal battle with Daley to continue because they fully expect the mayor to introduce requirements and regulations that they will surely find unreasonable. And Daley sounded like someone who planned on doing just that. "We will never give in to those who use guns to harm others," he said to city residents. "Your fight is my fight and we’re in this together." ___ Associated Press Writer Deanna Bellandi contributed to this report. Copyright 2010 The Associated Press.

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